Get whatever domain name you want!

So some breaking news in the Internet world, where ICANN are opening up the domain naming conventions and allowing people to register with whatever domain extension they want. It’s incredibly expensive and that might prevent the chaos on the net, but I guess we’ll see. Here are two news articles that a mate of mine sent to me earlier.

The regulatory body that oversees Internet domain names voted on Monday to revamp the domain naming system for websites, allowing them to end with words like “apple” and “orange” instead of suffixes such as “.com” or “.gov.”

 

“ICANN has opened the Internet’s naming system to unleash the global human imagination. Today’s decision respects the rights of groups to create new top level domains in any language or script,” the regulatory body said after a board meeting in Singapore.

“We hope this allows the domain name system to better serve all of mankind,” ICANN President and CEO Rod Beckstrom said in a statement.
ICANN, which stands for the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, said it will accept applications for domains with new suffixes from January 12 next year.

Experts say corporations and cities should be among the first applicants to register for new generic top-level domain names (gTLDs), resulting in domain names ending in brands like .toyota, .apple, or place names like .newyork.

Today, just 22 gTLDs exist — .com, .org and .info are a few examples — plus about 250 country-level domains like .uk or .cn. After the change, several hundred new gTLDs are expected to come into existence.

via

Good.food, learnto.salsa, glossy.lipstick — people and companies will be able to set up a website with almost any address by the end of next year if they have a legitimate claim to the domain name and can pay a hefty fee.

The Internet body that oversees domain names voted on Monday to end restricting them to suffixes like .com or .gov and will receive applications for new names from January 12 next year with the first approvals likely by the end of 2012.

And they can be in any characters — Cyrillic, Kanji or Devanagari for instance, for users of Russian, Japanese and Hindi.

“It’s the biggest change I think we have seen on the Internet,” Peter Dengate Thrush, chairman of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), told reporters.

“We have provided a platform for the next generation of creativity and inspiration.”

via

Hat Tip: Sozzle


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